Tuesday, October 3, 2017

Making an infill plane from scratch 11, rear tote and infill assembly.

After a lot of sanding, the rear tote seemed OK to me. And it was time to tackle the job of getting it mounted in the rear infill.
I drew some lines to work out from, sawed on the correct side of them with my small Japanese pullsaw, and got busy using the chisel to mortise out all the wood.
This part of the project also took quite some time, but in the end I had a nice snug fit of the rear tote.
The front transition could have been better, but since it will be covered by the blade 99% of the time, I decided that I would stick with the result.

A nice epoxy glue would have been my preferred medium if I had been at home, or a good wood glue a second choice.
Out here the only glue we have it some superglue and some too old winter grade glue where most of the solvents have vaporized over time, leaving the glue with a consistency like marshmallow.

I chose the marshmallow glue, because I have never really liked superglue or cyanoacrylate that much.
I might end up regretting it, but I figure that if everything else fails, I can still pour down a bit of superglue into the glue crack.

Clamping the assembly after gluing wasn't very easy. but I managed to secure it after a couple of attempts.

I believe that this glue has passed its prime.

Clamping arrangement of infill and tote.

10 comments:

  1. If it comes loose, pound a couple of nails into it. With a steel bottom plane there's no chance they'll come through and ruin a workpiece (kidding!!). Seriously though, the tote looks great, looking forward to seeing it assembled.
    Jeff

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    Replies
    1. Hi Jeff.
      Thanks for the fine suggestion :-)
      Actually the tote will receive at least one full rivet through it, and I guess that should hold it into place.

      Brgds
      Jonas

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  2. Marshmallow glue. I'll need to try that. Where can I get some? :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We have got plenty, but I doubt that it will ever be wildly popular.
      Maybe a real marshmallow actually works better?
      Cheers
      Jonas

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  3. Are you pulling our leg with the glue;) the handle looks awesome. Can't wait to see it mounted. Thanks for sharing.
    Chris

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    Replies
    1. HI Chris.
      No, I am sadly not making a joke about the glue. But I have to admit that so far it seems to work a lot better than I anticipated (which wasn't much though)
      Brgds
      Jonas

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  4. wow, that glue is... dont know what to say :-)

    The often seen method of installing the rear tote on the wood body was to have a recess in the back were you first slip in the rear before laying down the handle. That mechanical detail help the tote stay "more" secured if the glue fail, which it often do.
    Seen many a handled plane like that.

    Excited to se the final look of your plane.

    Bob, and Rudy, slowly recovering from the grand peanuts staying overnite :-)

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    Replies
    1. Hi Bob and Rudy
      I normally don't take pictures of the glue i use, but I thought that this was a great way of making a lot of woodworkers feel great about their own assortment of glue available to them in a project.
      Luckily I think it works OK.
      I think that the rear tote will be fairly well locked mechanically. It doesn't go all the way through the front, so it is stopped at the bed in a 90 degrees joint. But I also considered a sliding dovetail for it, but I was afraid that it would not end well, so I chose to just do a mortise.

      Have a relaxing day so you can get on top again :-)
      Brgds
      Jonas

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  5. I cannot say it enough: it looks fantastic!

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    Replies
    1. Thanks Bill.
      You are much too kind as usual :-)
      Brgds
      Jonas

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